You live in a city apartment and constantly have to buy fresh vegetables from the market? In this article we show you a fascinating alternative and how you can create a balcony garden yourself and grow vegetables there! It also tells you which vegetables are best for this purpose and gives you some helpful tips for growing them. Let yourself be inspired!

Growing vegetables on the balcony – helpful tips







If you want to grow vegetables in the city, you need a wind- and rain-protected balcony in the first place. Even smaller balconies are good for growing vegetables – in boxes, flower pots or pots, different varieties can thrive, and there are enough practical ways to use every inch of the balcony space. It is only important to find a flowerpot of the right size for each plant. For the different types of vegetables also have different needs – salads and spices, for example, can only manage with little space, while tomatoes and peppers thrive only in large flowerpots. Therefore, it is important to know more about the specifics of the specific variety, and below, we will give you useful information about it. Also important is the balcony location – if your balcony is facing south, southeast or southwest, you can expect a great harvest! Growing vegetables on the balcony gives you the opportunity to save a lot of money and be supplied with fresh ingredients at all times, and below, we will show you the vegetables that are particularly suitable for a balcony garden. Enjoy reading!

Growing vegetables on the balcony – tomatoes

The tomatoes are just perfect for a mini-garden on the balcony. They can be planted either in a box or in a large flower pot, and require little care. The plants are in need of warmth, so you should find a sunny spot for them. Do not forget to pour the tomatoes regularly to make them taste full. A practical variant for the smaller balconies are the cherry tomatoes, which do not grow so high.

Vegetable varieties for a balcony garden – cucumbers

The second type of vegetables you can choose are cucumbers. They can be sowed in a large box or bucket from the middle of March, and from the end of May to the end of September you can harvest fresh cucumbers twice a week! To thrive optimally, the cucumbers need enough sunlight, heat and watering – otherwise they can become bitter.

Growing vegetables on the balcony – lettuce

The leafy lettuce are particularly undemanding and can only get along with little space, so they are among the most popular vegetable cultivations in the flower pot. Salads can also thrive in shallow containers – a pot with a depth of only 15 cm, for example, is well suited for salad heads! The plants do not need much heat and sunlight, but regular watering.

paprika

You should sow the peppers from the end of February or the beginning of March, and keep them warm in the apartment for between 14 and 20 days. Just like tomatoes, the peppers need a lot of space, so choose a large flower pot that is at least 25 cm deep and 40 cm wide. The plants are in need of light and warmth, so you should choose a sunny location – wind protected, on a south wall.

aubergine

The eggplant is easy to maintain, does not grow too high, and the different varieties have interesting color, which helps you to make the balcony more colorful. All you need is a flower pot that is about 30 cm deep and 40 cm wide. When it comes to care, regular irrigation is especially important – the eggplants need a lot of water!

bush bean

The bush bean is also a good choice for a garden on the balcony. The mature plants are of a compact size and are particularly easy to care for. For this you could choose a flatter pot (for example 15 cm deep), but it should be wide enough. The bush bean needs regular irrigation and a calcareous soil in order to thrive optimally.

zucchini


Zucchini can also be grown in a flowerpot. The harvest starts in June and ends at the beginning of October. The plants are also easy to care for – they need humus and nutrient-rich soil, plenty of sunlight and sufficient irrigation.

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Jennie Montoya

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