Ground cover are inseparable part of every successful garden design. They make flower beds look more effective by forming a beautiful green carpet. However, the ground cover also offers a very practical use, because they prevent weeds, keep the soil moist enough, protect the soil from rain and strong wind and thus prevent erosion. In this article you will find a few interesting suggestions for evergreen groundcover that grow fast and require no special care.

Evergreen ground cover for spectacular garden design







Evergreen ground cover is suitable for any garden, as most varieties are not demanding at all. They are considered a good alternative to traditional turf, as they usually bloom in spring or summer, and in winter their evergreen leaves beautify the outside. The best planting time for groundcover is late summer, when weed subsides and there is still plenty of time until the onset of winter. Planting density and optimal growth conditions vary depending on the specific variety and you should inquire in advance. Here you will find useful information about some of the most common evergreen ground cover that can help you.

Ysander (Pachysandra terminalis)

The Ysander (Pachysandra terminalis), also called shade green and thick-males, is an excellent example of easy-care and beautiful-looking evergreen groundcover. The plant is native to Japan and forms thick green carpets in the shady areas of the garden. It likes dry and humus rich soil and can well tolerate the cover with foliage in autumn. The only drawback of this hardy plant may be that it is not one of the fast growing species and takes a few years to root well. The variety “Green Carpet” looks particularly attractive.

Ivy (Hedera helix)

When it comes to fast-growing evergreen ground cover, the ivy (Hedera helix) is only recommended. This relatively hardy plant can form a beautiful dark green carpet for less than a year. Be careful, however, that it can easily displace other, less competitive plants. The ivy like to have shade, as its leaves dry up easily in the sun, and can grow on almost all types of soil. The plant is undeniably an undemanding and attractive ground cover that can turn your garden into a green oasis.

Evergreen creeping spindle (Euonymus fortunei)

The Evergreen Creeping Spindle (Euonymus fortunei) is particularly attractive as a ground cover, as it impresses with its beautiful leaves. In most varieties, the leaves in winter get a delightful pink shade, which is particularly pronounced in the plants that grow in a sunny spot. Otherwise, the creeping spindles thrive just as well in sun and shade, and prefer the humus-rich and humid garden soils. The optimal planting density is about 6 to 12 plants per square meter.

Evergreen (Vinca)

Many evergreen groundcoverers are also distinguished by their towering blossoms. A good example of this is the leafy plant evergreen (Vinca). Its spectacular blue, pink or white flowers appear from May and can be seen until September. The periwinkle likes to have full sun to partial shade and we can thrive on all soil types, as long as they are not low in nutrients or sour. It is important that you ensure optimal growth conditions for the plant – otherwise the plant carpet will remain sparse and weeds can grow through again and again. The recommended planting density is 10 to 12 plants per square meter.

Balkan Cranesbill (Geranium macrorrhizum)

A sturdy and durable groundcover that can give any garden a nice look is the Balkan Cranesbill (Geranium macrorrhizum). This beautiful plant grows very fast and reaches a height of about 30 centimeters. It blooms from May to July, and there are three varieties on the market: “ginger” (light purple flowers), “spessart” (white to pale rose flowers) and “czakor” (purple flowers). The cranesbill grows well in both the sun and in the shade, and likes dry, not too humus rich soils. The optimal planting density per square meter is no more than eight plants. It would be even more interesting if you combine the different varieties.

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Jennie Montoya

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